Scientifically proven: The effectiveness of posters

Thankfully, in the modern era, discoveries are made every single day in science and medicine, and businesses are always inventing new solutions to old problems. The only problem that many organisations, medical professionals, and volunteers still have to face is how to disseminate important information to the public and colleagues in an effective manner.

Of course, there are many different ways to convey a point, but the goal is really to make that idea stick in your students’ or coworkers’ minds. It’s an even bigger challenge to get them to pay attention in the first place. Slideshows, which people usually turn to, would be great if every presentation wasn’t just plain white with black Times font and traditional clip art. Add in the fact that you can’t really hang a slideshow in a waiting room or in your office after presenting it, and you realise that this media has digital barriers.

Scientifically proven
The alternative is posters. Yes, you may think that nowadays we only use the Internet, but the proof of posters’ effectiveness is in science – literally. A study published in the Health Information and Libraries Journal found that poster presentations are some of the most commonly used formats for communicating information in academic and public health fields. Further to the point, the report identified that these tools have the ability to increase knowledge, change attitudes, and alter behaviours.

“Posters can increase knowledge, change attitudes and alter behaviours.”

The effectiveness of poster presentations is particularly present in the medical community, as they prove to be invaluable in waiting rooms and great at conveying information in developing countries. According to the Journal of Pakistan Medical Association, about 97 percent of individuals surveyed stated that they understood a poster placed in a healthcare facility insisted that they should get their blood pressure checked. Of those people, 86 percent actually did so within 30 days.

There are no cons
It should be pretty clear that posters are a valuable tool in the healthcare sector, but the benefits of the media itself extend far beyond knowledge transfer.

Let’s take business presentations as an example. You don’t have a lot of time to spread critical information. This means that a slideshow is out of the question in many cases, as these presentations require more wires than a Kiss concert (less makeup and fire, however) and the average marketing or sales professional isn’t always going to be an IT expert.

Additionally, posters provide a very concise overview of a topic, ensuring that presenters only convey the necessary information. This promotes active learning, as the terse amount of data on posters inspires the audience to participate and ask questions. A discussion can quickly form and information will spread at a faster rate than otherwise passive forms of presenting, such as those that lack visual aids.

Visualization is a critical aspect of a presentation
Visualisation is a critical aspect of a presentation.

 

Posters are a long-lasting medium. Slideshows​, on the other hand, are closed immediately and never opened again. That feedback can help presenters alter their strategies for conveying information in other forms, such as a journal or brochure. After all, a slight change in diction could make a world of a difference – just ask the Oxford comma.

Organisations and professionals can work closely with cloud-based printing services as an inexpensive and easy way to procure posters. With cutting-edge printers and expedited shipping, managing printing providers can deliver the best looking posters to your door without the need for expensive trips to the local print shop.

The bottom line is simple: Posters have been around in every industry for a long time because they work.


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